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Lord-Lieutenant Badge

THE LORD-LIEUTENANT

Lord-Lieutenant Lady Gretton

Jennifer, Lady Gretton, JP

Lady Gretton, as Lord-Lieutenant, is the official representative of Her Majesty The Queen for the County and City of Leicester, and was appointed on 1 February 2003.    
On 24 February 2003 Lady Gretton was appointed Chairman of the Lord Chancellor's Advisory Committees on Justices of the Peace and Keeper of the Rolls for Leicestershire. In 2004 Lady Gretton was made a Dame of the Order of St John.
Lady Gretton (Jennifer Ann) was born on 14th June 1943 at St Ives, Cornwall.  She is the widow of the Third Baron Gretton, and has a married son (the Fourth Baron Gretton), and a married daughter.  Lady Gretton has a granddaughter and three grandsons.
Lady Gretton has been running the Stapleford Estate near Melton Mowbray since the death of her husband in 1989.  In the same year she was appointed to the Leicestershire and Rutland Country Land and Business Association Committee, the Student Affairs Committee and Advisory Council at Harlaxton Manor (the British Campus of the University of Evansville) and President of the Melton Mowbray and District Model Engineering Society.   She served on the Country Land and Business Association Environment and Water Committee at national level from 1994 -1998.  In 1994 she was appointed President of the Rural Community Council (Leicestershire and Rutland) and in 1999 President of LOROS (the Leicestershire and Rutland Organisation for the Relief of Suffering).  In 2001 she was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of Leicestershire.
Lady Gretton has been a Member of the Committee of Somerby Parochial Church Council since 1991, Church Warden of All Saints Church Somerby 1992-1995, and has been a member of the Leicester Cathedral Council since 2003.
She is Patron of six Parishes in Leicestershire and Staffordshire, and is patron or president of a wide range of local charities and organisations.
Lady Gretton is interested in sport, especially tennis when she has the time, and music, singing with the Oakham School Choral Society.  She is interested in all aspects of steam, and restored the Stapleford Miniature Railway with the help of volunteers, and instigated the Stapleford Steam Rally in 1996.    
For all correspondence and invitations, and further information please contact:
The Leicestershire Lieutenancy Office
County Hall
Glenfield
Leicester
LE3 8RA
Tel:    0116 305 6060
Fax:   0116 305 6221
email: lieutenancyoffice@leics.gov.uk
Web:  www.leics.gov.uk/lieutenancy
Download a copy of the Lord-Lieutenant's biographical details (PDF Format).

Guidance for organisers of events attended by the Lord-Lieutenant

This guidance has been prepared as a result of frequent enquiries from the organisers of events attended by the Lord-Lieutenant.   There is no standard procedure to be followed on such occasions because there are so many variables between events, venues etc.   The following guidance needs to be considered with this in mind, and advice sought from the Lieutenancy Office if necessary.
The Office of The Lord-Lieutenant  
The office of the Lord-Lieutenant for a County or Counties dates back to 1547 when the military functions of the Sheriff were transferred to the Lieutenancy.   To this day the Lord-Lieutenant retains the link with the armed services, serving as Vice-President of the Reserve Forces and Cadet Association (RFCA). Many of the Lord-Lieutenant’s official duties are mostly, but not entirely, of a ceremonial nature. However, the Lord-Lieutenant attends many social occasions in support of the local community, civic, business and cultural life of the County and City.  
Lady Gretton, as Lord-Lieutenant, is the official representative of Her Majesty The Queen for the County and City of Leicester, and was appointed on 1 February 2003.
A lady Lord-Lieutenant does not wear a prescribed uniform, but does wear a lady Lord-Lieutenant’s badge on appropriate occasions. Lady Gretton is pictured wearing the badge at the top of the page.
Description of Lord-Lieutenant in Printing and Inscriptions
In connection with events there may be printing or inscriptions to be considered.   Although 'Jennifer, Lady Gretton JP' should not be abbreviated the title of her office can vary dependent upon the circumstances in which it is being used.   In full it is Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire, but this could become H.M. Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire, or Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire, and the advice of the Lieutenancy Office should always be sought before any printing or engraving is ordered.
Arrival Arrangements
Frequently the Lord-Lieutenant will be chauffeur-driven and generally the car will need to be parked nearby, and therefore parking instructions should be sent to the Lieutenancy Office beforehand.   Similarly if the Lord-Lieutenant is driving herself parking details will be needed.   
Subject to the time of day and the duration of the visit it would be appreciated if refreshments could be made available for the Lord-Lieutenant's chauffeur if present.
It is very important to state clearly the entrance at which the Lord-Lieutenant should arrive, especially where there is any risk of misunderstanding.
The Lord-Lieutenant is usually received on arrival by the host, or a senior representative of the host.   It is appropriate to greet the Lord-Lieutenant with words to the effect 'My Lord-Lieutenant welcome to ……………….'.   Subsequently the Lord-Lieutenant may be addressed as Ma'am (pronounced as in jam) or Lady Gretton.   
If the arrival is to a formal gathering or service, particularly if there is to be a procession involving other civic dignitaries, the Lord-Lieutenant takes precedence (as a direct representative of the Crown) and so would usually be the last to enter, subject to a few exceptions. If the audience or congregation is seated, it is customary to stand until the Lord-Lieutenant takes her seat. At the conclusion the Lord-Lieutenant would be the first to exit. This point of protocol is further explained in the next section in the context of seating.
The Visit or Event
If during the course of the visit or event there is to be a public speech by the host, or a similar person, the preamble would commence with 'My Lord-Lieutenant'.   
Often the host will accompany the Lord-Lieutenant throughout a visit or event, perhaps handing over at various stages to individuals with a special role.   At the end of the visit or event it would be usual for the host to escort the Lord-Lieutenant to the departure point before final farewells.   
The Lord-Lieutenant should never be left unattended, not least because she cannot be expected to know the planned route or sequence of events.
On formal occasions when other dignitaries are present it may be necessary to consider their order in any seating. What is certain is that the Lord-Lieutenant, as The Queen’s representative, has precedence throughout the City and County, subject to a few exceptions, e.g. the High Sheriff has precedence when in attendance upon Her Majesty's High Court Judges at the Crown Court, as do Civic Heads (Lord Mayors, Mayors and Chairmen) at their own civic functions. For further advice please contact the Lieutenancy Office.
A common misunderstanding is that the host should sacrifice his or her place, in any seating or similar arrangements, to the Lord-Lieutenant.   This is not the case unless the Lord-Lieutenant were to take the principal place in her own right e.g. being President of the organisation being visited.
For some major ceremonial events ladies may enquire whether hats and gloves should be worn.   The Lord-Lieutenant's view is that regardless of whether she may wear a hat or gloves, she would wish ladies to do whatever they prefer in this respect.
The Lieutenancy Office
For further information and advice, please contact:
Tim Webster
Deputy Clerk of the Lieutenancy
County Hall
Glenfield
Leicester
LE3 8RA
Tel: 0116 305 6060
Fax:0116 305 6221
email:tim.webster@leics.gov.uk
Download a copy of the guidance notes produced for event organisers (PDF Format).

Style and Title

Although “Jennifer, Lady Gretton JP” should not be abbreviated the title of her office can vary dependent upon the circumstances in which it is being used.  In full it is Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire, but this could become H.M. Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire, or Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire, and the advice of the Office of the Clerk of the Lieutenancy should always be sought before any printing or engraving is ordered.
Lord-Lieutenants are appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister, and the document by which the appointment is confirmed is described as Letters Patent under the Great Seal.  This impressive document is still prepared in the traditional way on vellum.

Role and Duties of the Lord-Lieutenant  

The Lord-Lieutenant’s first and foremost duty is to uphold the dignity of the Crown.  She seeks to promote a spirit of co-operation by encouragement of the voluntary services and benevolent organisations, and by taking an interest in the business, industrial and social life of the County and various voluntary activities within it.  The Lord-Lieutenant’s role is, like the Sovereign’s, essentially non-political.
The main duties of the Lord-Lieutenant may be summarised as follows:
(a) Arranging visits of Members of the Royal Family, and escorting Royal Visitors as appropriate.
(b) Presentation of medals and awards on behalf of Her Majesty.
(c) Participation in civic, voluntary and social activity within the County.
(d) Liaison with local units of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Army, Royal Air Force and their associated Cadet Forces.
(e) Leadership of the Local Magistracy as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Justices of the Peace (Magistrates).

Form of Address

Those involved in meeting the Lord-Lieutenant or arranging visits by her often seek advice on the form of address which should be used.
Lady Gretton appreciates that some people are very concerned to do things correctly, but she does not wish people to be unduly concerned about the precise form of address etc.  For those who wish to have some advice it is suggested that on first meeting the Lord-Lieutenant she should be addressed as “Lord-Lieutenant” and in the preamble to a speech “My” could be used before “Lord-Lieutenant”.  Subsequently Ma’am (pronounced as in jam) or Lady Gretton could be used.  When the Lord-Lieutenant is making a visit to an organisation or place it is helpful to ensure that she is always escorted, this ensures that she will follow the route intended and meet the relevant people.  As far as arrival and departure is concerned it is usual for the senior person present to welcome the Lord-Lieutenant and escort her to her car on departure.

Precedence

The Lord-Lieutenant, as a direct representative of the Crown, has precedence throughout the City and County subject to certain exceptions e.g. the High Sheriff has precedence when in attendance upon Her Majesty’s High Court Judges at the Crown Court, as do Civic Heads (Lord Mayors, Mayors and Chairmen) at their own civic functions
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Page Last Updated: 24 July 2012